THE COURT: Alright, ladies and gentlemen, have you arrived at a verdict or verdicts? Mr. Foreman, if you'd hand it to the sheriff please, or -- hand them to the sheriff.

Alright, your verdicts are in good form, and read as follows:

We, the jury, having found Jessie Lloyd Misskelley Jr. guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Michael Moore fix this sentence at a term of life in the Arkansas Department of Corrections. Signed by T.J. Williams, foreman.

Is this your unanimous verdict, ladies and gentlemen?

MULTIPLE VOICES: Yes, yes your Honor.

THE COURT: Count two. We, the jury, having found Jessie Lloyd Misskelley guilty of second-degree murder in the death of Steven Branch fix this sentence at a term of twenty years in the Arkansas Department of Corrections. Again, signed by the foreman, T.J. Williams. Is that your unanimous verdict, ladies and gentlemen?

(NO AUDIBLE RESPONSE)

THE COURT: Alright, verdict uh, form three. We, the jury, having found Jessie Lloyd Misskelley Jr. guilty of second-degree murder in the death of Christopher Byers fix his sentence at a term of twenty years in the Arkansas Department of Correction. Signed by T.J. Williams, foreman. Is that your unanimous verdict, ladies and gentlemen?

MULTIPLE VOICES: Yes.

THE COURT: Questions, gentlemen? Do you want the jury polled?

STIDHAM: Yes, your Honor.

THE COURT: Alright, again ladies and gentlemen, if these are your verdicts, as your name is called please answer yes.

CLERK: Carla Pratt. (Price?)

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Stephen Green.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: James Rainwater.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Theresa Burgess.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Ronnie Smith.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Lloyd Champion.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Margie Woods.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Donna Ludina Moore.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Janet Luter.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: April Lundstrom.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: Aubrey Dacus.

RESPONSE: Yes.

CLERK: T.J. Williams.

RESPONSE: Yes.

THE COURT: Any other questions, gentlemen? Alright, ladies and gentlemen, with the thanks of the Court for your consideration of this case, you'll be excused from further attendance and need not report back in the morning at 9:30 -- and for that matter, for the next two years, uh, you'll be exempt from jury duty. I thank you very much for your consideration of, of a difficult case and one that obviously had uh, ramifications that are not normally uh found in criminal cases uh the attention, the pressure I know you went through, and I certainly appreciate your hard work and dedication, and thank you very much.

I have been asked to inquire of you by the media whether or not you want one of your member to be a spokesman, whether or not you choose not to make any statement whatsoever, and I want to point out to you you're not obligated to say anything to anyone about your deliberations. If you all would like to have a minute or two to discuss that before you depart uh --

MULTIPLE VOICES: We have discussed it.

THE COURT: You have discussed it? Alright, and what, what is your pleasure in that matter?

MULTIPLE VOICES: No comment, no comment.

THE COURT: Alright, then, then I'll certainly honor that and I'll expect everyone else to. And you're not obligated to make any statement to anyone, so. With the thanks of the Court, you're free to go, and I really appreciate your consideration. If you'd like, I can have officers escort you to your cars, and um, you're free to go. I want everybody to remain in the courtroom while the jury departs.

Everyone please rise while the jury leaves.

(COURTROOM NOISES)

Alright, you may be seated.

Alright, Mr. Misskelley, if you could come around the front here, and Dan and... I need another docket sheet, a blank.

UNKNOWN: (INAUDIBLE)

THE COURT: You want me to just write on the blank one in the back, and then y'all move it?

(MUMBLING)

THE COURT: Alright, Mr. Misskelley, did you hear the jury's finding and the reading of the verdict in your case?

MISSKELLEY: Yes, sir.

THE COURT: Do you have any legal reason or cause to tell the Court why sentence should not be imposed at this time?

MISSKELLEY: (MUMBLE)

THE COURT: You're gonna have to an -- I heard you, but you need to answer out a little bit louder.

MISSKELLEY: No, sir.

THE COURT: Alright. Uh, it's my responsibility and duty to tell you that you have a right to appeal your convictions in these cases. You must give notice within the statutory period of time, you have court appointed counsel that can consult with you and your family in that regard. But you are notified you do have a right to appeal and you're entitled uh, to a bond on these charges. Do you gentlemen want an appeal bond fixed at this time or you -- 'cause it starts your time running -- or do you wanna discuss that with Mr. Misskelley and his family?

STIDHAM: We'll have to discuss that, your Honor.

THE COURT: Alright. Is there anything you want to say before sentence is imposed? You have a right to make any statement you care to at this time.

MISSKELLEY: No, your Honor.

THE COURT: You also have a right to have your attorneys make any comment in your behalf that you want them to. You understand that?

MISSKELLEY: Yes, sir.

STIDHAM: Your Honor, the one comment that we'd like to make is we respectfully request the Court to run the sentences concurrently as opposed to consecutively.

THE COURT: Alright, well, I, I understand your statement in that regard, and of course, that's a matter that addresses itself to the discretion of the Court and I'll con -- I'll consider that. Um, is there anything else you want to say to the Court or do you have any questions you want to ask the Court at this time?

MISSKELLEY: No, sir.

THE COURT: Are you satisfied with the service and advice of your attorneys through this trial?

MISSKELLEY: Yes, sir.

THE COURT: Alright. Alright, based upon the jury's verdict finding you guilty of first-degree murder in the death of Michael Moore, you'll be adjudicated guilty and you'll be sentenced to the Arkansas Department of Corrections for a term of life.

And in the count involving the death of Steven Branch, the jury having found you guilty of second-degree murder, you'll be adjudicated guilty and be sentenced to an additional term of twenty years in the Arkansas Department of Corrections.

And in regard to the death of Christopher Byers, the jury having found you guilty of second-degree murder, you'll be adjudicated guilty of second-degree murder and be sentenced to an additional term of twenty years in the Arkansas Department of Corrections.

It'll be the finding of the Court that all of those sentences will, will run consecutively. That is, you will receive a life sentence plus forty years. And that'll be the judgment of the Court.

You'll be remanded to the custody of the sheriff for immediate transportation to the Department of Corrections.

Mr. Sheriff, you'll be directed to forthwith take him to the Arkansas Department of Corrections and delivered to the proper custodian. And that'll be the judgment of the Court, and this Court will be in recess until February the 22nd.